Webinar woes

Like many of you, I am trying to ensure that I keep my skills and knowledge as current as I can.  I don’t have CPD obligations, but it’s easy to get stale or set in our ways, and there is always something new to learn.  (Are you a Duolingo fan?  I’m now in my fourth month of learning Italian and can confidently tell anyone who asks that the elephant is wearing a pink shirt but does not drink lemonade.)

And stepping into the training breach is the webinar.  I have two main areas of interest these days – AML and writing/publishing – and in the past weeks I have signed up for about a half-dozen webinars on various aspects of these.  And although they are slick enough (most of us have wrestled Zoom/Webex/Teams into submission and worked out that we shouldn’t film ourselves against a bright background), they are really not an efficient way for me to learn.  It may be the ones I choose – i.e. the free ones – but everyone presenting is, to put it bluntly, trying to sell something, which is entirely understandable.  Unfortunately, this means that they spend a good five minutes introducing themselves and then, of course, give you only a bit of information.  And indeed, why should they give you everything for free?  But the upshot is that from an hour’s webinar I will probably get three bits of useful information – and that’s not a good return on my time.  It’s not possible to “skim-watch” a webinar in the way I will routinely skim-read documents to find the relevant bits.

This also partly explains another shortcoming of the webinar: I just can’t concentrate.  Unless the webinar is riveting and jam-packed with information that I want, my mind and my mouse wander, and before you know it, I’m on eBay looking for those handy labels that you stick on boxes in the freezer and a new pair of summer slippers for my husband [true story].  However, the real problem for me with webinars – and again, this is the ones I have seen – is that they seem to be too general, too fluffy.  They are opinion pieces rather than hard information.  So yes, I can guess for myself that the pandemic is going to lead to a rise in pandemic-related frauds: what I want is examples, and how to spot the signs, and what we can do about it.  Perhaps the format – demanding our total attention when there’s no-one to check that you are actually listening (or even in the room) – is better suited to more technical information.  In pre-pandemic times, I once attended a webinar on the significance of the Sixth Money Laundering Directive.  The trainer/presenter went through the directive article by article, explaining what it meant.  No opinions, no calls for greater co-operation, no deferring courteously and flatteringly to other experts – just hard facts that I wanted and needed to understand.  I was riveted.

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4 Responses to Webinar woes

  1. Nigel Harvey says:

    Love this, i’m on day 60 of espanol. My confident line is that she drinks milk and wants to buy a cheap brown hat.

    • Welcome to the blog, Nigel, and thank you for your comment. Yes, the Duolingo choice of vocab is baffling: in the animal line, I have learned things like spider, whale, shark and penguin – with the exception of the first, I’m not sure they come into regular conversation all that often. Unless Italy is very different to how I remember it…

  2. Webinars involve too much concentration for me. Gimme podcasts, headphones and some gardening or DIY anytime. Great podcasts include The Dark Money Files, The Suspicious Transaction Report, The Intelligence from the Economist, The Taxcast by the Tax Justice Network, but my favourite is Power Corrupts by Brian Klass, I could listen to that voice all day long.

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